Protecting our butterflies is vital to the environment

The State of the Nations Butterfly report which is published every five years shows long term and ten year trends – and it’s waving a danger flag. The most recent report published in 2015 indicates that overall a staggering 76 percent of our butterflies declined in abundance and occurrence over the past 40 years.

Four species of butterfly have become extinct over the past 150 years and the rest face an uncertain future. Our moths are doing no better as the total number over the past 40 years has declined overall by 28 percent, even as low as 40 percent in southern areas.

UK’s favourite wildlife species at risk of extinction

Some of Britain’s favourite wildlife is at risk of becoming extinct unless there is a new, 21st-century agricultural revolution, experts are warning. Species from hedgehogs to skylarks and birds of prey are being wiped out – in part by companies with vested interests in “destructive” factory farming, it was claimed on World Wildlife Day, which takes place today. The “alarming” declines in wildlife will threaten not just the richness of the planet but also our ability to grow food, according to the RSPB.

Chytridiomycosis: A Key Example of the Global Phenomenon of Wildlife Emerging Infectious Diseases

During the latter half of the 20th century, it was noticed that global amphibian populations had entered a state of unusually rapid decline. Hundreds of species have since become categorized as “missing” or “lost,” a growing number of which are now believed extinct. Amphibians are often regarded as environmental indicator species because of their highly permeable skin and biphasic life cycles, during which most species inhabit aquatic zones as larvae and as adults become semi or wholly terrestrial. This means their overall health is closely tied to that of the landscape.

Half a century after Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the circle is complete

On September 27, 1962, Rachel Carson published the book Silent Spring, which warned against the harmful effects of pesticides on the environment, especially on birds, without knowing that insects that are of vital importance for biodiversity and food would be central in it. Dutch toxicologist Henk Tennekes published in September 2010 a scientific article in a professional journal for toxicology, followed by the book "A Disaster in the Making" and describes the ecological disaster as follows: "The pesticides industry creates a 'toxic landscape' in which only the crop can survive."

EFSA confirma que los neonicotinoides son peligrosos para las abejas y polinizadores silvestres

Rachel Carson escribió el 27 de septiembre de 1962 Primavera Silenciosa, (Silent Spring) que advertía de los efectos perjudiciales de los pesticidas en el medio ambiente -especialmente en las aves- sin saber que los polinizadores vitales para la biodiversidad y la alimentación serían uno de los más perjudicados en su libro ya culpaba a la industria química de la creciente contaminación.​ En septiembre del 2010 el Dr Toxicólogo Henk Tennekes publicó un articulo científico en una revista de toxicología, Siguió un libro….. “Un Desastre en Potencia”.

Systemic pesticide concerns extend beyond the bees

In the summer of 2010, Henk Tennekes from Experimental Toxicology Services Nederland at Zutphen warned that the accumulation of neonicotinoids in the environment would not only decimate useful insects but also have a knock-on effect on other species, including birds (Curr. Biol. (2011) 21, R137–R139). At the time, Tennekes did not find much support for his views and went on to publish his warnings as a book — The Systemic Insecticides: A Disaster in the Making.

Earth has entered an era of mass extinction unparalleled since the dinosaurs died out 66 million years ago

A 2015 study co-authored by Paul Ehrlich, professor emeritus of biology, and colleagues showed that Earth has entered an era of mass extinction unparalleled since the dinosaurs died out 66 million years ago. The specter of extinction hangs over about 41 percent of all amphibian species and 26 percent of all mammals, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), which maintains a list of threatened and extinct species.

Die Zahl der weltweit bedrohten Tier- und Pflanzenarten hat dieses Jahr einen neuen Rekordstand erreicht

Mit rund 25'800 bedrohten Tier- und Pflanzenarten sei im zu Ende gehenden Jahr ein neuer dramatischer Höchststand erreicht worden. Ein Jahr zuvor waren es noch 24'000 bedrohte Arten. "Wir Menschen verursachen das grösste Artensterben seit Ende der Dinosaurier", resümierte Eberhard Brandes, Vorstand des WWF Deutschland. Auch in der Schweiz gingen die Bestände einiger Arten merklich zurück. Mehr als 40 Prozent der Insektenarten in der Schweiz gälten als bedroht, darunter Bienen und Schmetterlinge, sagte WWF-Sprecherin Perrette Rey in Lausanne auf Anfrage.

The population of 28 British bird species more than halved over periods of 31–48 years

The 20th annual BirdTrends report highlights the rapid decline of the greenfinch, whose population has dropped by 59pc in the UK in just ten years. Bird experts say the decline is caused by a widespread and severe outbreak of a disease called trichomonosis, which first affected bird populations in 2006. The steepest long-term populations declines measured are for Turtle Dove, Tree Sparrow, Willow Tit, Grey Partridge and Nightingale, which have all declined by 90% or more since 1967, as, almost certainly, has Lesser Spotted Woodpecker.